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An aerial view of Signal Iduna Park in Dortmund, Germany. The stadium will be one of 10 host venues for Euro 2024.

The 10 amazing stadiums that will host Euro 2024 matches next summer

The draw for Euro 2024 takes place this evening in Hamburg, with anticipation rising across the competing nations as their schedule for next summer becomes set in stone. 

Germany beat Turkey to the hosting rights of the next European Championship and have selected 10 of the finest stadiums in Europe to host the 51 matches.

We’ve profiled every host city that will act as the epicentre of European football in the summer of 2024.

Berlin

The Olympiastadion in Berlin, which will host the final of Euro 2024, has an incredibly complicated past. Its links with the 1936 Olympics remain indelible and the most memorable footballing moment was the Zidane headbutt in 2006.

But there’s something alluring about the arena and the capital of Germany will be the perfect host for the European Championship, with its dedication to currywurst and heavy techno. A must-visit.

Cologne

Widely regarded as the party capital of Germany, Cologne will be a popular destination for visiting fans next summer.

Locals are rarely seen with anything other than a Kolsch, and its position in the heart of the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region makes it the perfect base camp for matches in Dortmund, Dusseldorf and Gelsenkirchen.

The Rhein-Energie Stadion, which will host five matches, was the venue for Joe Cole’s jaw-dropping volley against Sweden at the 2006 World Cup. More memories will be made next summer.

Dortmund

The city isn’t a renowned tourist destination, but the Westfalenstadion needs no introduction.

One of the most famous stadiums in Europe, Dortmund’s home ground appears on the bucket list of football fans worldwide and will host a semi-final in 2024.

A word of warning though; the Yellow Wall, which is the largest free-standing grandstand in Europe, will be all-seated for the duration of the tournament.

Dusseldorf

Dusseldorf was overlooked in 2006, but did host matches at the 1974 World Cup and Euro ’88.

The seventh biggest city in Germany houses substantial Greek, Polish and Turkish populations, so there’s potential for a large home crowd if any of the trio are drawn to play in Dusseldorf.

A smart, imposingly modern arena will host five matches, including one Round of 16 match and the last quarter-final. The city is eagerly awaiting the moment when it hosts some of Europe’s finest players.

General view of the Merkur Spielarena in Dusseldorf.

General view of the Merkur Spielarena in Dusseldorf. The stadium was built in 2004, but didn’t host any matches at the 2006 World Cup.

Frankfurt

Frankfurt is a major international hub, with its massive airport and dominant financial district, and the local football side are currently enjoying a renaissance.

Eintracht were Europa League winners in 2022 and made the Champions League knockouts this season, capitalising on the white-hot atmosphere created at Deutsche Bank Park.

The city isn’t renowned as a major tourist destination, with most sites of historical interest demolished during the Second World War, but every cuisine is catered for and the views from the Main Tower are breathtaking.

Inside the Deutsche Bank Park in Frankfurt. The stadium will host five matches, including one Round of 16 tie.

Inside the Deutsche Bank Park in Frankfurt. The stadium will host five matches, including one in the Round of 16.

Gelsenkirchen

The smallest city to host Euro 2024 matches, Gelsenkirchen is a real footballing hotbed.

Home of Schalke 04, one of Germany’s biggest clubs despite their recent struggles, the Veltins Arena is always sold out for home games and was the venue for England’s defeat to Portugal at the 2006 World Cup.

But there’s not much else to do in Gelsenkirchen; its other main attraction in this coal-mining centre is the local slag heap.

Hamburg

Hamburg is Germany’s second-largest city and the most northern venue at Euro 2024.

Visiting supporters will be enticed by the legendary nightlife on the Reeperbahn and the stadium is one of the coolest in northern Europe.

The tournament draw will take place here in December, along with five matches next summer.

Leipzig

Communist meets classical in this vibrant East German city, home at one time to Bach and the notorious Stasi.

The local club, RB Leipzig, have boomed in status (if not popularity) since it hosted five matches at the 2006 World Cup and the stadium is one of the more eye-catching of the tournament.

Anybody based in Berlin should take a day trip to Leipzig or the nearby Dresden, where there’s enough culture to compensate for the endless beer drinking you’ll be undertaking.

An aerial shot of the Red Bull Arena in Leipzig, the only East German venue at Euro 2024.

An aerial shot of the Red Bull Arena in Leipzig, the only East German venue at Euro 2024.

Munich

Biergartens, foot-long wursts, lederhosen, Glockenspiel and an iconic stadium; Munich isn’t a city that needs the hard sell.

It will host the opening match and five other games, including a semi-final.

The opening match of Euro 2024 will be held in Munich, along with five other matches in the tournament.

The opening match of Euro 2024 will be held in Munich, along with five other matches in the tournament.

Stuttgart

The city of Stuttgart is an enigma; one of the richest cities in Germany has a local accent that’s widely regarded as unintelligible. Go figure.

Home to numerous mineral baths, Mercedes and Porsche, Stuttgart has arguably the strongest beer scene outside of Munich.

And the Mercedes-Benz Arena, which will host five matches including a quarter-final, looks like a futuristic Hampden Park. What’s not to like?


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